Tie Knot

3 Best Ways to Tie a Tie

Every man should know how to tie a tie.  Every gentleman knows more ways than one.

The reason for being able to tie your own tie without having to ask your fiancée’s father for help on your wedding day goes without saying.  What is often left behind in the common man’s rulebook is that there are several different ways to tie a tie, some which are more appropriate than others based on the occasion, the tie, and the rest of the outfit.

A well-tied tie is the first serious step in life.

— Oscar Wilde

There are about 85 different ways to tie a tie, most of which are novelty tie knots or are just a different derivation of the common knots I will list here.  There are three main ways that every tie-wearer should know like the back of their hand: the four-in-hand, the half-Windsor, and the Windsor (sometimes called the full-Windsor or the double-Windsor).

3 Best Ways to Tie a Tie

Four-in-Hand

What this knot is like

Asymmetrical, narrow, small, very easy to tie, is longer than most ties

What to wear with this knot

Common button down shirt, recommended for a slimmer tie and regular or narrow collar

When to wear this knot

Semi-formal events, work-casual environments, and casual weekends

 

3 Best Ways to Tie a Tie

Half-Windsor

What this knot is like

Symmetrical, bigger than four-in-hand but half the size of a Windsor, versatile, triangular

What to wear with this knot

Any dress shirt, works with most tie widths and lengths but will be shorter than the four-in-hand

When to wear this knot

Formal, semi-formal events, and work-casual environments

 

3 Best Ways to Tie a Tie

Windsor

What this knot is like

Symmetrical, biggest of the three knots, wide, triangular

What to wear with this knot

Any dress shirt, best shown off with spread collars, recommended for longer and wider ties

When to wear this knot

Formal, semi-formal, and conservative environments and events

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